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Posted on 27 Sep 2016   native plants, wild edibles

Book excerpt: Jerusalem Artichoke, from the book The Lazy Gardener’s Guide to Easy Edibles

Available in early October 2016   Jerusalem artichoke The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a native North American sunflower that is grown for its tuberous roots. Native to virtually every state in the U.S. and the eastern half of Canada, the Jerusalem artichoke, or sunchoke, is an easy-to-grow vegetable in most of North America and in many places around... Read More »
Posted on 18 Aug 2016   native plants

Five Easy Summer Flowers That Can Take The Heat

Five Easy Summer Flowers That Can Take The Heat I don’t know about where you are, but we’ve entered the hottest part of the summer. August tends to be when we have the highest temperatures of the season. We just finished a week of heat indexes near 110 degrees. This week has been a fluke, with much cooler temperatures... Read More »
Posted on 14 Jul 2016   fruit trees, soil

Five ways to protect your fruit trees and other plants from the summer heat

                                      Five ways to protect your fruit trees and other plants from the summer heat It’s summer – and for many of us, it’s hot and dry. While many plants do well in the warm weather with adequate water, hot and dry conditions can cause stress and weaknesses in even the toughest plant. Here are five ways to protect... Read More »
Posted on 04 Apr 2016   native plants, nut trees, wild edibles

The Acorn Bread Experiment

The Acorn Bread Experiment      I’ve always enjoyed wild edibles and I recently decided to finally do something I’ve been wanted to do for awhile – bake acorn bread. This little blog post chronicles my experience doing it and the mistakes I made along the way… Acorns, as everyone knows, fall in the fall and and are important food... Read More »
Posted on 09 Jan 2015   potatoes

How to prepare seed potatoes for planting

How to prepare seed potatoes for planting In our area, the “old-timers” always said that February 14th was the traditional day to plant potatoes (and cut back rose bushes; maybe an excuse to get away from the house on Valentine’s Day?). The Texas Agrilife Extension service more or less confirms this (see this list of planting dates – http://easttexasgardening.tamu.edu/homegardens/VEGeTABLE.html).... Read More »
Posted on 14 Nov 2014   nut trees

Roots to Fruit video: How To Roast Chestnuts Over an Open Fire

Just in time for Christmas….Episode #2 of Roots to Fruit: how to roast chestnuts on an open fire outside!   Fun and well worth doing if you get a chance. Read More »
Posted on 08 Nov 2014   Uncategorized
Posted on 23 Oct 2014   Uncategorized

How to Grow Apple Trees From Seeds

How to Grow Apple Trees From Seeds   We all love apples (at least most of us do!) and we want you to buy our apple trees. But wouldn’t it be cool if you could grow your own apples from seed?   But due to hybridization and breeding, no modern apple variety comes “true to seed.” That means that... Read More »
Posted on 18 Oct 2014   native plants, nut trees, wild edibles

How to Roast Chestnuts on an Open Fire

How to Roast Chestnuts On an Open Fire   The American chestnut (Castenea dentata) tree once graced the woods of the eastern side of North America. Unfortunately, a fungal disease (blight) was introduced on an imported chestnut tree from Asia. The American chestnut, with no natural resistance to the fungus, succumbed to the disease. Today, only a handful of... Read More »
Posted on 08 Oct 2014   native plants, wild edibles

Five More Surprising Wild Edibles That You Can Eat Now!

FREE FOOD part 2: Five More Surprising Wild Edibles That You Can Eat Now! Here are five more wild, free foods that you can eat right now. And of course, here is our little quasi-legal disclaimer:   Disclaimer: Always be sure to correctly identify plants before you eat them. By using this information, you hold us blameless in the... Read More »
Posted on 05 Oct 2014   native plants

The Amazing Allegheny Chinquapin

The Amazing Allegheny Chinquapin     Allegheny chinquapin (or chinkapin, depending on how you want to spell it) is a species (Castanea pumila) of small chestnut that is native to the eastern half of the United States, including the South. The Allegheny chinquapin is the smaller cousin of the American chestnut. The American chestnut was almost entirely eliminated in... Read More »
Posted on 03 Oct 2014   fruit trees

How to Clone Pomegranate Trees At Home

How to Clone Pomegranate Trees At Home   Most cultivated (non-wild) fruit trees are grafted onto a rootstock. The rootstock is a variety bred specifically for the quality it gives the fruit tree from the roots. Nemaguard, for example, is a rootstock we use that protects the almonds, peaches, apricots, nectarines, and plums from certain harmful soil nematodes. Grafting... Read More »
Posted on 01 Oct 2014   almonds

How Grow Almond Trees

How to Grow Almond Trees        Almond trees are native to south Asia and the Middle East. Almond trees are in the same genus as peaches and plums, making them closely related but distinctly different from those popular fruits. The almond itself is a drupe, with an outer shell over a hard seed coat that contains the almond.... Read More »
Posted on 01 Oct 2014   native plants, wild edibles

FREE FOOD: Five Surprising Wild Edibles (that aren’t fruit trees)

Of course we want you to buy fruit trees…but have you ever tried some of these free wild foods? FREE FOOD: Five Surprising Wild Edibles (that aren’t fruit trees) Disclaimer: Always be sure to correctly identify plants before you eat them. By using this information, you hold us blameless in the event of any consumption of incorrect wild edibles.... Read More »
Posted on 29 Sep 2014   BLueberries, Interview

A quick interview with Dr. Dave Creech, blueberry expert and horticulturalist extraordinaire

Dr. David Creech is professor emeritus of agriculture and associate director of SFA Gardens.  He was also a professor of mine at SFASU.  He is still teaching and leading programs there at SFA and he was willing to respond to some questions I had for him.  I’ll include a link at the end of this that details his qualifications... Read More »
Posted on 26 Sep 2014   Uncategorized

Excerpt from Southern Bounty: How To Grow and Enjoy Southeastern Native Fruits and Nuts

Here is a chapter excerpt from Southern Bounty: How to Grow and Enjoy Southeastern Native Fruits and Nuts.  This book is available in Kindle or print format from Amazon, and soon (hopefully!) a bookstore near you! Mayhaw   Natural Habitat and Background   Mayhaws are small pome fruits that are grown on compact trees in the Hawthorn family. Native... Read More »
Posted on 25 Sep 2014   Uncategorized

Using Chicken Litter to Fertilize Fruit Trees

Using Chicken Litter to Fertilize Fruit Trees We live in the heart of Texas poultry country, and as a result, there is always chicken litter to be had. That got me thinking about using poultry littler as a natural fertilizer for fruit trees. So if one was so inclined, how would you use chicken litter to fertilize fruit trees?... Read More »
Posted on 27 Sep 2016   native plants, wild edibles

Book excerpt: Jerusalem Artichoke, from the book The Lazy Gardener’s Guide to Easy Edibles

Available in early October 2016   Jerusalem artichoke The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a native North American sunflower that is grown for its tuberous roots. Native to virtually every state in the U.S. and the eastern half of Canada, the Jerusalem artichoke, or sunchoke, is an easy-to-grow vegetable in most of North America and in many places around... Read More »
Posted on 18 Aug 2016   native plants

Five Easy Summer Flowers That Can Take The Heat

Five Easy Summer Flowers That Can Take The Heat I don’t know about where you are, but we’ve entered the hottest part of the summer. August tends to be when we have the highest temperatures of the season. We just finished a week of heat indexes near 110 degrees. This week has been a fluke, with much cooler temperatures... Read More »
Posted on 14 Jul 2016   fruit trees, soil

Five ways to protect your fruit trees and other plants from the summer heat

                                      Five ways to protect your fruit trees and other plants from the summer heat It’s summer – and for many of us, it’s hot and dry. While many plants do well in the warm weather with adequate water, hot and dry conditions can cause stress and weaknesses in even the toughest plant. Here are five ways to protect... Read More »
Posted on 04 Apr 2016   native plants, nut trees, wild edibles

The Acorn Bread Experiment

The Acorn Bread Experiment      I’ve always enjoyed wild edibles and I recently decided to finally do something I’ve been wanted to do for awhile – bake acorn bread. This little blog post chronicles my experience doing it and the mistakes I made along the way… Acorns, as everyone knows, fall in the fall and and are important food... Read More »
Posted on 09 Jan 2015   potatoes

How to prepare seed potatoes for planting

How to prepare seed potatoes for planting In our area, the “old-timers” always said that February 14th was the traditional day to plant potatoes (and cut back rose bushes; maybe an excuse to get away from the house on Valentine’s Day?). The Texas Agrilife Extension service more or less confirms this (see this list of planting dates – http://easttexasgardening.tamu.edu/homegardens/VEGeTABLE.html).... Read More »
Posted on 14 Nov 2014   nut trees

Roots to Fruit video: How To Roast Chestnuts Over an Open Fire

Just in time for Christmas….Episode #2 of Roots to Fruit: how to roast chestnuts on an open fire outside!   Fun and well worth doing if you get a chance. Read More »
Posted on 08 Nov 2014   Uncategorized
Posted on 23 Oct 2014   Uncategorized

How to Grow Apple Trees From Seeds

How to Grow Apple Trees From Seeds   We all love apples (at least most of us do!) and we want you to buy our apple trees. But wouldn’t it be cool if you could grow your own apples from seed?   But due to hybridization and breeding, no modern apple variety comes “true to seed.” That means that... Read More »
Posted on 18 Oct 2014   native plants, nut trees, wild edibles

How to Roast Chestnuts on an Open Fire

How to Roast Chestnuts On an Open Fire   The American chestnut (Castenea dentata) tree once graced the woods of the eastern side of North America. Unfortunately, a fungal disease (blight) was introduced on an imported chestnut tree from Asia. The American chestnut, with no natural resistance to the fungus, succumbed to the disease. Today, only a handful of... Read More »
Posted on 08 Oct 2014   native plants, wild edibles

Five More Surprising Wild Edibles That You Can Eat Now!

FREE FOOD part 2: Five More Surprising Wild Edibles That You Can Eat Now! Here are five more wild, free foods that you can eat right now. And of course, here is our little quasi-legal disclaimer:   Disclaimer: Always be sure to correctly identify plants before you eat them. By using this information, you hold us blameless in the... Read More »
Posted on 05 Oct 2014   native plants

The Amazing Allegheny Chinquapin

The Amazing Allegheny Chinquapin     Allegheny chinquapin (or chinkapin, depending on how you want to spell it) is a species (Castanea pumila) of small chestnut that is native to the eastern half of the United States, including the South. The Allegheny chinquapin is the smaller cousin of the American chestnut. The American chestnut was almost entirely eliminated in... Read More »
Posted on 03 Oct 2014   fruit trees

How to Clone Pomegranate Trees At Home

How to Clone Pomegranate Trees At Home   Most cultivated (non-wild) fruit trees are grafted onto a rootstock. The rootstock is a variety bred specifically for the quality it gives the fruit tree from the roots. Nemaguard, for example, is a rootstock we use that protects the almonds, peaches, apricots, nectarines, and plums from certain harmful soil nematodes. Grafting... Read More »
Posted on 01 Oct 2014   almonds

How Grow Almond Trees

How to Grow Almond Trees        Almond trees are native to south Asia and the Middle East. Almond trees are in the same genus as peaches and plums, making them closely related but distinctly different from those popular fruits. The almond itself is a drupe, with an outer shell over a hard seed coat that contains the almond.... Read More »
Posted on 01 Oct 2014   native plants, wild edibles

FREE FOOD: Five Surprising Wild Edibles (that aren’t fruit trees)

Of course we want you to buy fruit trees…but have you ever tried some of these free wild foods? FREE FOOD: Five Surprising Wild Edibles (that aren’t fruit trees) Disclaimer: Always be sure to correctly identify plants before you eat them. By using this information, you hold us blameless in the event of any consumption of incorrect wild edibles.... Read More »
Posted on 29 Sep 2014   BLueberries, Interview

A quick interview with Dr. Dave Creech, blueberry expert and horticulturalist extraordinaire

Dr. David Creech is professor emeritus of agriculture and associate director of SFA Gardens.  He was also a professor of mine at SFASU.  He is still teaching and leading programs there at SFA and he was willing to respond to some questions I had for him.  I’ll include a link at the end of this that details his qualifications... Read More »
Posted on 26 Sep 2014   Uncategorized

Excerpt from Southern Bounty: How To Grow and Enjoy Southeastern Native Fruits and Nuts

Here is a chapter excerpt from Southern Bounty: How to Grow and Enjoy Southeastern Native Fruits and Nuts.  This book is available in Kindle or print format from Amazon, and soon (hopefully!) a bookstore near you! Mayhaw   Natural Habitat and Background   Mayhaws are small pome fruits that are grown on compact trees in the Hawthorn family. Native... Read More »
Posted on 25 Sep 2014   Uncategorized

Using Chicken Litter to Fertilize Fruit Trees

Using Chicken Litter to Fertilize Fruit Trees We live in the heart of Texas poultry country, and as a result, there is always chicken litter to be had. That got me thinking about using poultry littler as a natural fertilizer for fruit trees. So if one was so inclined, how would you use chicken litter to fertilize fruit trees?... Read More »
Posted on 12 Dec 2016   fruit trees

Recommended Fruit Trees Varieties For Texas

We get questions on a regular basis from people about what varieties of fruit trees grow best in their area…Here’s a list of some of the best varieties of fruit trees for specific areas in Texas…more parts of the country will be added in the future.   Recommended fruit trees varieties for Texas: Amarillo/Lubbock/Panhandle Apples: Red Delicious, Yellow Delicious,... Read More »
Posted on 05 Nov 2016

Processing and Using Black Walnuts

Processing and Using Black Walnuts It’s November, which for us means that we are constantly watching the weather and hoping for cold fronts, which bring the fruit trees closer to dormancy. Cold weather means dormant trees that we can dig and ship to you! Fall is also the time of the year that the wild and cultivated nuts are... Read More »
Posted on 23 Oct 2016

10 Native Trees Giveaway!

We want to give away some trees! Check out the widget below to enter to win 10 native fruit trees of your choice!   a Rafflecopter giveaway Read More »
Posted on 15 Aug 2016

Gardening Books

    Coming soon:   Read More »
Posted on 18 Apr 2016

Gardening for Pollinators

    This isn’t as  blog post as much as it’s an opportunity for you to read this excellent article on gardening for pollinators. For the most part, you won’t have fruit on your trees if pollinators are absent. If that’s an issue for you, or if you want to do your part fo help pollinators, check out this... Read More »
Posted on 29 Jun 2015

Strange edibles: Daylilies

Strange edibles: Day Lilies   Daylilies (or day lilies) are easy-to-grow ornamental plants that aren’t actually lilies. Belonging to the genus Hemerocallis, these plants are called day lilies because of their similarity in appearance to true lilies and because each of their blooms are at the best for only one day. The genus name Hemerocallis is a combination of... Read More »
Posted on 12 May 2015

In praise of dewberries…

In praise of dewberries   Sometimes we mow them, sometimes we hoe them, but every year…we eat them. Dewberries (Rubus spp.) are a late spring/early summer treat for us here, though we often have to control them in both in the garden and among the fruit trees. Dewberries are the small, native cousin of the cultivated blackberry. They grow... Read More »
Posted on 10 Apr 2015

Short survey and a chance to win a...

It’s time for another giveaway! But this time, all you have to do is answer three short questions in a survey. Once you’ve done that, you will be automatically entered into the drawing for the Amazon gift card. We will email the gift card code to the winner of the gift card. We will select a winner Sunday evening.... Read More »
Posted on 01 Jan 2015

2015 Fruit Tree Giveaway

Happy new year! We are giving away 10 nectarines (you choose the varieties). The winner of this contest will receive the 10 nectarine trees with free shipping to their doorstep. Check out the info below to enter!     a Rafflecopter giveaway Read More »
Posted on 22 Oct 2014

The Top Five Beneficial Insects for the...

The Top Five Beneficial Insects for the Home Orchard   We all know that insects can be a pest in the garden or orchard. In fact, I’ve devoted a couple of blog posts to control of insect pests, because disease and insect pests tend to be at least occasional problems on almost any cultivated fruit tree.   But thankfully,... Read More »
Posted on 21 Oct 2014

The Fruit Tree Spacing Primer

The Fruit Tree Spacing Primer Fruit trees, even if you just have a couple of them, require a certain spacing between trees to ensure adequate growth and to prevent disease. All of the trees we sell are standard varieties, which means that they are “old school” larger trees. And in the case of apples, pears, and Asian pears, there... Read More »
Posted on 27 Sep 2016   native plants, wild edibles

Book excerpt: Jerusalem Artichoke, from the book The Lazy Gardener’s Guide to Easy Edibles

Available in early October 2016   Jerusalem artichoke The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a native North American sunflower that is grown for its tuberous roots. Native to virtually every state in the U.S. and the eastern half of Canada, the Jerusalem artichoke, or sunchoke, is an easy-to-grow vegetable in most of North America and in many places around... Read More »
Posted on 18 Aug 2016   native plants

Five Easy Summer Flowers That Can Take The Heat

Five Easy Summer Flowers That Can Take The Heat I don’t know about where you are, but we’ve entered the hottest part of the summer. August tends to be when we have the highest temperatures of the season. We just finished a week of heat indexes near 110 degrees. This week has been a fluke, with much cooler temperatures... Read More »
Posted on 14 Jul 2016   fruit trees, soil

Five ways to protect your fruit trees and other plants from the summer heat

                                      Five ways to protect your fruit trees and other plants from the summer heat It’s summer – and for many of us, it’s hot and dry. While many plants do well in the warm weather with adequate water, hot and dry conditions can cause stress and weaknesses in even the toughest plant. Here are five ways to protect... Read More »
Posted on 04 Apr 2016   native plants, nut trees, wild edibles

The Acorn Bread Experiment

The Acorn Bread Experiment      I’ve always enjoyed wild edibles and I recently decided to finally do something I’ve been wanted to do for awhile – bake acorn bread. This little blog post chronicles my experience doing it and the mistakes I made along the way… Acorns, as everyone knows, fall in the fall and and are important food... Read More »
Posted on 09 Jan 2015   potatoes

How to prepare seed potatoes for planting

How to prepare seed potatoes for planting In our area, the “old-timers” always said that February 14th was the traditional day to plant potatoes (and cut back rose bushes; maybe an excuse to get away from the house on Valentine’s Day?). The Texas Agrilife Extension service more or less confirms this (see this list of planting dates – http://easttexasgardening.tamu.edu/homegardens/VEGeTABLE.html).... Read More »
Posted on 14 Nov 2014   nut trees

Roots to Fruit video: How To Roast Chestnuts Over an Open Fire

Just in time for Christmas….Episode #2 of Roots to Fruit: how to roast chestnuts on an open fire outside!   Fun and well worth doing if you get a chance. Read More »
Posted on 08 Nov 2014   Uncategorized
Posted on 23 Oct 2014   Uncategorized

How to Grow Apple Trees From Seeds

How to Grow Apple Trees From Seeds   We all love apples (at least most of us do!) and we want you to buy our apple trees. But wouldn’t it be cool if you could grow your own apples from seed?   But due to hybridization and breeding, no modern apple variety comes “true to seed.” That means that... Read More »
Posted on 18 Oct 2014   native plants, nut trees, wild edibles

How to Roast Chestnuts on an Open Fire

How to Roast Chestnuts On an Open Fire   The American chestnut (Castenea dentata) tree once graced the woods of the eastern side of North America. Unfortunately, a fungal disease (blight) was introduced on an imported chestnut tree from Asia. The American chestnut, with no natural resistance to the fungus, succumbed to the disease. Today, only a handful of... Read More »
Posted on 08 Oct 2014   native plants, wild edibles

Five More Surprising Wild Edibles That You Can Eat Now!

FREE FOOD part 2: Five More Surprising Wild Edibles That You Can Eat Now! Here are five more wild, free foods that you can eat right now. And of course, here is our little quasi-legal disclaimer:   Disclaimer: Always be sure to correctly identify plants before you eat them. By using this information, you hold us blameless in the... Read More »
Posted on 05 Oct 2014   native plants

The Amazing Allegheny Chinquapin

The Amazing Allegheny Chinquapin     Allegheny chinquapin (or chinkapin, depending on how you want to spell it) is a species (Castanea pumila) of small chestnut that is native to the eastern half of the United States, including the South. The Allegheny chinquapin is the smaller cousin of the American chestnut. The American chestnut was almost entirely eliminated in... Read More »
Posted on 03 Oct 2014   fruit trees

How to Clone Pomegranate Trees At Home

How to Clone Pomegranate Trees At Home   Most cultivated (non-wild) fruit trees are grafted onto a rootstock. The rootstock is a variety bred specifically for the quality it gives the fruit tree from the roots. Nemaguard, for example, is a rootstock we use that protects the almonds, peaches, apricots, nectarines, and plums from certain harmful soil nematodes. Grafting... Read More »
Posted on 01 Oct 2014   almonds

How Grow Almond Trees

How to Grow Almond Trees        Almond trees are native to south Asia and the Middle East. Almond trees are in the same genus as peaches and plums, making them closely related but distinctly different from those popular fruits. The almond itself is a drupe, with an outer shell over a hard seed coat that contains the almond.... Read More »
Posted on 01 Oct 2014   native plants, wild edibles

FREE FOOD: Five Surprising Wild Edibles (that aren’t fruit trees)

Of course we want you to buy fruit trees…but have you ever tried some of these free wild foods? FREE FOOD: Five Surprising Wild Edibles (that aren’t fruit trees) Disclaimer: Always be sure to correctly identify plants before you eat them. By using this information, you hold us blameless in the event of any consumption of incorrect wild edibles.... Read More »
Posted on 29 Sep 2014   BLueberries, Interview

A quick interview with Dr. Dave Creech, blueberry expert and horticulturalist extraordinaire

Dr. David Creech is professor emeritus of agriculture and associate director of SFA Gardens.  He was also a professor of mine at SFASU.  He is still teaching and leading programs there at SFA and he was willing to respond to some questions I had for him.  I’ll include a link at the end of this that details his qualifications... Read More »
Posted on 26 Sep 2014   Uncategorized

Excerpt from Southern Bounty: How To Grow and Enjoy Southeastern Native Fruits and Nuts

Here is a chapter excerpt from Southern Bounty: How to Grow and Enjoy Southeastern Native Fruits and Nuts.  This book is available in Kindle or print format from Amazon, and soon (hopefully!) a bookstore near you! Mayhaw   Natural Habitat and Background   Mayhaws are small pome fruits that are grown on compact trees in the Hawthorn family. Native... Read More »
Posted on 25 Sep 2014   Uncategorized

Using Chicken Litter to Fertilize Fruit Trees

Using Chicken Litter to Fertilize Fruit Trees We live in the heart of Texas poultry country, and as a result, there is always chicken litter to be had. That got me thinking about using poultry littler as a natural fertilizer for fruit trees. So if one was so inclined, how would you use chicken litter to fertilize fruit trees?... Read More »
Posted on 01 Jan 2015   Uncategorized

2015 Fruit Tree Giveaway

Happy new year! We are giving away 10 nectarines (you choose the varieties). The winner of this contest will receive the 10 nectarine trees with free shipping to their doorstep. Check out the info below to enter!     a Rafflecopter giveaway Read More »
Posted on 11 Oct 2014

Your USDA Zone and Why It’s...

Your USDA Zone and Why It’s Important For every fruit tree and plant on our website, we list the USDA zones where the tree or bush grows best. So what on earth is a USDA zone anyway?   The USDA zones are the divisions of the country that the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has defined based on... Read More »
Posted on 15 Oct 2014

Interview With the Owner of Efurd...

Interview With the Owner of Efurd Orchards Efurd Orchards is the largest orchard (that we know of) in our part of Texas. I had the opportunity to speak with one of the owners and a managing employee of the orchards and ask them some questions about their operation. I thought it might be of interest to our readers. I’ve... Read More »
Posted on 07 Oct 2014

Five Strange Fruit That You’ve...

Five Strange Fruit That You’ve Probably Never Seen     Here in the temperate region of the United States, we are used to certain types of fruit trees: apples, pears, peaches, plums, figs, and the like. And then there are the natives – everything from muscadines to chinquapins. We occasionally get asked about more exotic fruit and though we... Read More »
Posted on 28 Sep 2014

Excerpt from How To Grow Apples in The...

Here is an excerpt from How to Grow Apples In The Southern U.S. by Trey Watson.  Rootstocks for Southern Apples All modern fruit trees are grafted onto a rootstock of a different variety. Apple trees are no different. They are grafted onto rootstocks that give the apple tree its final size. All the apple varieties that produce the great-tasting,... Read More »
Posted on 23 Oct 2016

10 Native Trees Giveaway!

We want to give away some trees! Check out the widget below to enter to win 10 native fruit trees of your choice!   a Rafflecopter giveaway Read More »
Posted on 13 Oct 2014

The Historic Fruit Tree (well, peach...

The Historic Fruit Tree (well, peach and apple) Varieties of the South      The fruit varieties we buy and grow today are the results of decades of marketing and more than a century to commercial fruit production, processes that changed the make up of the available fruit varieties. As urbanization took hold in America in the late 1800’s and... Read More »
Posted on 12 Dec 2016

Recommended Fruit Trees Varieties For...

We get questions on a regular basis from people about what varieties of fruit trees grow best in their area…Here’s a list of some of the best varieties of fruit trees for specific areas in Texas…more parts of the country will be added in the future.   Recommended fruit trees varieties for Texas: Amarillo/Lubbock/Panhandle Apples: Red Delicious, Yellow Delicious,... Read More »
Posted on 09 Oct 2014

Five Useful Organic Pesticides for...

Five Useful Organic Pesticides for Fruit Trees     Almost everyone who grows even just a little fruit wants to use as few chemicals as possible; many of our customers are interested in growing fruit trees organically. We’ve experimented with number products over the years, and here are a few organic solutions for fruit trees that really work:  ... Read More »
Posted on 09 Oct 2014

How Many Fruit Trees Do I Need?

How Many Fruit Trees Do I Need? Our goal here is to provide you as many fruit trees as you want. We sometimes get this question from people interested in our trees: “How many fruit trees do I need?” The answer is as variable as the people asking. For people wanting to grow fruit for profit, plant as many... Read More »
Posted on 03 Oct 2014

Fruit Trees and Soil

Fruit Trees and Soils – A Love Affair   “The soil is the great connector of lives, the source and destination of all.” – Wendell Berry     Of all things necessary to grow fruit trees – or anything else, for that matter – soil is perhaps one of the most overlooked and underappreciated. Soil is where it all... Read More »